Ladies Locked and Loaded: Legal, emotional ramifications of taking a life

News wraps up an in-depth look at
Illinois' new concealed carry law,
and what you need to know to make
an informed decision about whether
or not you will legally arm yourself
for protection.
Hundreds of FOX 32's Facebook
friends said they want to purchase
a weapon for the first time now that
it's legal, and a great number of
those responders are women. These
ladies want to be locked and loaded
in Illinois. It's not as simple as
buying a gun, loading it up with
bullets and carrying it around with
you.
Sandy Wright plans to purchase a
weapon for protection and be a
responsible gun owner. The former
Vice President of Goldstar Families
of Chicago, and knows the
emotional toll of losing a loved one
to gun violence.
Wright's father was a Chicago police
officer. He was killed in the line of
duty in 1993. The former Goldstar
VP said his death is the motivation
behind her decision to be a
responsible gun owner and to take
an active stance on keeping herself
safe.
Carrying a loaded gun under the
state's new concealed carry law has
some thinking twice about pulling
the trigger, because using that
weapon on another does have legal
ramifications, no matter the
outcome.
Wright said there is no question -
she would shoot someone who tried
to rob her store or break into her
home if it came down to that.
But anytime you pull the trigger,
there is an investigation and
potentially a prosecution. Legal
expert Attorney Karen Conti joined
Good Day to explain the legal
ramification of injuring another
person with a gun, taking a life or
being an irresponsible gun owner.
Conti said a split second decision
can change your life forever.