E-cigarette use among teens doubles, not FDA regulated

An
alarming report on kids and
smoking: The e-cigarette, battery
powered cigarettes that deliver
nicotine, is apparently a big hit
with teenagers. But they are not
regulated by the FDA.
The Centers for Disease Control
polled high school students and
found the use of e-cigarettes has
doubled in the last year. Experts
say they are viewed as gadgets -
and kids like that.
E-cigarettes deliver nicotine in a
vapor and come in different flavors
that appeal to young people.
The CDC found that 1-in-10 high
school students tried an e-cigarette
last year, up from 1-in-20 the year
before.
E-cigarettes were introduced to help
adults quit smoking. But with
middle school and high school
students using them, doctors are
concerned.
Many kids tried them, without ever
having smoked tobacco cigarettes.
That pattern has doctors worried
that e-cigarettes will get kids
hooked on nicotine more easily,
leading them to tobacco, which is
more harmful.
Chicago's health department has
been leading a campaign against
menthol cigarettes, to keep kids
from trying what is considered a
smoother smoke, which they say
leads to addiction.
Some states have banned the sale
to minors, but not all.
E-cigarette sales have doubled
almost every year since they were
introduced. They are expected to
reach $1 billion this year.